Ready Mix sign on the Nullarbor Plain -32.2168, 125.3608 – Google Maps

Thought I had posted this before, but seems not.

This is an interesting bit of history:
-32.217, 125.3608 – Google Maps

“The Main Roads Department [of Western Australia] had a couple of ‘dozers out there,” recalls Mr Kalajzich, 64, who has just clocked up 50 years of service with the same company. “We surveyed it, they [the Main Roads employees] cut it out and I think we ended up giving them a couple of slabs or beers for doing it. That’s how we used to operate. It was not a big deal.” According to Dr Whyte’s research, the signage was made without either the approval of the pastoralist who leased the land on which the logo was carved or the state government. He writes that despite some suggestions it was used as an emergency landing strip, the sign was probably “no more than a giant corporate graffito: lettering littering the landscape”. An aerial photograph taken in 1967 – and captioned “the largest sign in the world” – still hangs in Readymix’s Perth headquarters. But that claim is also no longer true. In a forest on his land outside Austin, Texas, David Luecke has cleared trees “for the hell of it” to spell out his surname.

Readymix wideweb 470x337 0

(Via www.smh.com.au.)

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Having a play with Linode

I thought I would have a play after hearing about Linode.

Seems like a pretty slick hosting system at a reasonable price. Will test for a month and then decide if I want to migrate to it. (New server)

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Which makes more sense

Via:

Occupy* Posters.

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Engineers stand with three generations of Mars rovers – ABC News

This is awesome!

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Engineers stand with three generations of Mars rovers – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

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Heron Island Research Trip

I got the chance to make the trip to Heron Island research station with Chris Roelfsema. The research station has a policy that does not allow kids to visit the station, so we stayed at the resort and just used the research facilities.

Pictures here (click on image):

We drove to Gladstone on Friday and spent the night in a motel. While en route we got a call that the desalination plant had failed at the resort so they said we could not stay. After about an hour we got the ok to go anyway, but that there would be water restrictions. The research station has its own desalination plant, so we thought could always shower there.

Saturday we took the ferry over to Heron. The crossing was very calm and took 2 hours. Once on the island we had an induction into the station.

Sunday Chris, Diana, Mitch and I got out to dive three transects on the south side of the island. The weather was perfect on Sunday, no wind at all, the sea was like a mill pond. We had whales pass 50 meters away as well. The sunsets here are fantastic, with many people gathering at the harbour to watch.

On Sunday night the wind picked up which meant that the trip out on Monday morning was canned. Chris and Mitch did a snorkel transecting after breakfast and we ended up getting 3 transects done on the north side of the reef in the afternoon.

Tuesday Diana and I did a Reef Check snorkel transect on Research Station Reef and in the afternoon Chris and I dived north side and entrance sites doing photo transects and Coral watch.

Wednesday Diana and I did Shark Bay Reef Check transect and in the afternoon Chris and I dived Harry’s Bommie and Heron Bommie, with Chris doing spectrometer dive and I took 360 photos of bommies for Javier’s 3D modelling software.

Thursday Diana and I did Jetty Reef Reef Check transect but in the afternoon there was no dive as the winds were to high.

We Caught the ferry back on Friday, as the winds were forcast to stay high for the next few days. The ferry trip was a little more exciting in the big seas!

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